Breaking: Broadband deficit benefits criminals in Tipperary

Noel Dundon

Reporter:

Noel Dundon

Email:

nd@tipperarystar.ie

Fourteen Garda Stations cannot log onto Pulse as they do not have  broadband.

Criminals in Tipperary have a greater chance of getting away with their activities due to the fact that fourteen Garda Stations do not have broadband and are therefore not connected to the Pulse system, The Tipperary Star can reveal.
The shocking discovery comes at a time when rural crime continues to be a major problem in Tipperary with 388 incidents recorded in 2017. And, though this figure has dropped by 16% on the previous year, it still represents a major problem for rural dwellers and Gardai alike.
Fianna Fáil TD for Tipperary, Jackie Cahill has said that it is wholly unacceptable that 14 Garda stations in the county are still not connected to the Garda Pulse system as a result of poor or non-existent broadband.
“In November 2016, there were 16 stations not connected so while there has been a marginal improvement, it’s still not acceptable.


Deputy Jackie Cahill

“What is abundantly clear is that the ability of An Garda Síochána to do their job is being hampered by poor or non-existent broadband.
“Across the country, 77 stations are not hooked up to Pulse despite continued promises by the Government. This just isn’t good enough. The point of a national system is to have all stations feeding their data in so that a national picture of the incidences of crime can be monitored, and remedial action, in terms of resourcing and planning, can be taken.
“Garda stations in addition to schools, farms, households and small businesses are being held back by poor IT infrastructure in rural Ireland. Enough is enough.
“The Minister must work with the Garda management to ensure all of our stations are feeding into the Pulse system as quickly as possible,” Deputy Cahill said.
There are many broadband blackspots throughout Tipperary and though there are a multiplicity of providers operating in the county, coverage is still generally regarded as being pretty poor, especially in isolated areas which do not have population densities to support the provision of a reliable and efficient service.