Nenagh traffic plan: Tipperary Co Co urged to demolish building during school holidays

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Nenagh traffic plan: Tipperary Co Co urged to demolish building during school holidays

Cllr Hughie McGrath

Tipperary County Council has been asked to demolish buildings required under the town's proposed traffic management plan over the school summer holidays.

The request has been made by Independent Cllr Hughie McGrath, who has also urged that the local council looks at streets outside of the immediate town centre when it comes to finalising the plan.

“We need to be looking at more than just three streets,” he told Nenagh MDC. “We should be looking at Upper William Street and Clare Street and the roundabout at the railway station.”

The junction of Stafford Street and the railway station is a cause of delays as creamery trucks turn at it. “We need to hear from the co-op because large trucks are still mounting the footpath. We need to explain to the co-op that there needs to be a timetable,” he said.

While he was aware that the council's design team were in talks with Arrabawn, he said the council needed to know that the co-op's plans suited the council. “I would be slow to support a traffic management plan that didn't take in the whole of the town,” said Clr McGrath.

District manager Marcus O'Connor told him that the council had met Arrabawn CEO Conor Ryan and a design plan for the work was almost complete and ready to be submitted.

“They are making progress. They are acutely aware of it. It does need to be addressed,” he said.

However, Cllr McGrath warned that it could be five years before the co-op would seek planning permission and, at that, the work could be subject to having the finance.

Despite his concerns, Cllr McGrath said: “The town recognises the employment they give and are willing to go along with what goes with it.”

He was supported by Cllr Ger Darcy, who said Arrabawn was “huge” in terms of the county's economy.

But, he said, the town needed to be able to deal with up to 100 truck movements a day “and rising”.

Mr O'Connor said they should each operate in a “spirit of co-operation”.