Nenagh's St Conlon's Community Nursing Unit gets positive Hiqa report

Tipperary Star reporter

Reporter:

Tipperary Star reporter

Email:

news@tipperarystar.ie

Nenagh's St Conlon's Community Nursing Unit gets positive Hiqa report

St Conlon's Community Nursing Unit in Nenagh has passed its latest Health Information Quality Authority (Hiqa) test with flying colours.

However, the State inspectorate still found that the facility is suffering due to its unsuitablity as a care home for its current needs.

It also found that the centre was non-compliant in a minor way when it came to medicine management.

The ongoing finding of St Conlon's as not fit for purpose comes despite it being announced that a new 50-bed premsies is to be built beside Nenagh Hospital at a cost of €9m.

The building has already been given the go-ahead by the HSE and is scheduled to be completed by 2021.

That news was revealed by local TD Alan Kelly at the end of March.

“These will be for long-stay, short-stay, respite and rehabilitation,” said Deputy Kelly, who announced the project while he was Minister for the Environment in the last Government.

“It is a welcome development and I know it is a priority for the HSE,” he said.

The authority carried out its inspection on January 3 and 4 of this year.

Overall, the inspector found that the provider and person in charge demonstrated a commitment to meeting the requirements of the Health Act 2007 (Care and Welfare of Residents in Designated Centres for Older People) Regulations and the National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in Ireland. Many improvements had been completed since the previous inspection.

The inspector was satisfied that residents nursing and healthcare needs were being met. Nursing documentation was completed to a high standard. The inspector observed sufficient staffing and skill-mix on duty during the inspection and staff rotas confirmed these staffing levels to be the norm.

The inspector noted that an ethos of respect and dignity for both residents and staff was evident.

There was evidence of good practice in all areas. However, the 15 single bedrooms did not offer sufficient space for residents and did not comply with the size set out in the National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in Ireland.

Other improvements were required to administration and recording of some medicines.

The inspector generally found evidence of good medicines management practices and sufficient policies and procedures to support and guide practice.

However, improvements were required in relation to administration of some medicines.

Nursing staff advised the inspector that some medicines were crushed prior to administration. These medicines had not been individually prescribed as “crushed”.

The centre had followed up the finding, stating that all medicinal products were now administered in accordance with the directions of the prescriber of the resident concerned. No medications were crushed unless prescribed by the general practitioner.

The inspector also found that records did not always indicate the rationale for administration of PRN psychotropic medicines, what other interventions had been tried to manage the behaviour and the effect and outcome for the resident following the administration of the medicine.

The centre said that, as per the National Restraint Policy 2010, use of psychotropic medicines is documented weekly at the Centre by RGNs and reviewed by the director of nursing. This information is returned quarterly to HIQA.