Supt. Lordan bids farewell to Thurles after three years

Superintendent Pat Lordan of Thurles Garda Station.
Superintendent Pat Lordan is bidding farewell to Thurles Garda Station, having served here for the last three years. The announcement was made at Thurles District Court on Tuesday last week, with Judge Elizabeth McGrath, Thurles Gardaí and Solicitors all wishing the Corkman the best in his future role as Det Supt at Mullingar Garda Station.

Superintendent Pat Lordan is bidding farewell to Thurles Garda Station, having served here for the last three years. The announcement was made at Thurles District Court on Tuesday last week, with Judge Elizabeth McGrath, Thurles Gardaí and Solicitors all wishing the Corkman the best in his future role as Det Supt at Mullingar Garda Station.

Supt Lordan told the Tipperary Star he enjoyed his time in Thurles, finding it be a “very rewarding position in An Garda Siochána” working closely with the Joint Policing Comittees involving Thurles Town Council and North Tipperary Town Council. His work brought him into contact with senior members of the GAA for big match days as well as working in general with Neighbourhood Watch groups and the Residence Associations.

On Friday, one of the biggest community alert schemes in the whole country was launched in Killenaule (see next week’s Tipperary Star). These are the kinds of initiatives which build trust between Gardaí and local people. Thurles as a rural town faces different challenges than those of the bigger cities, he says. “You’re dealing with a different kind of crime here as opposed to, say, Dublin. Quite a lot of theft of farm equipment and farm machinery. We try to link in with the IFA and Muintir na Tíre to try and advise some of the farmers on how better secure their equipment.” Liberty Square in particular has seen a marked reduction in night-time brawling over the weekends. “There’s been a huge reduction in public order offences, and that’s down to two main things: better policing because of the new rosters we have, and the downturn in the economy. Following on from that, there’s been a huge reduction in the number of assaults as well.” However, there are still a significant number of burglaries around Thurles, with thieves targeting diesel and metals.

Thurles Gardaí are not only active in crime detection: Supt Lordan is proud that the guards were instrumental in helping to deliver milk and bread out to elderly people left stranded in their homes up in the mountains during the last few winters.

Full interview in this week’s Tipperary Star.