Roscrea WWI war hero honoured

Pictured at the Jack Moyney-Victoria Cross celebration are the Organising Committee and Ashbury Residents Association. L/R: Eileen O Meara, Tommy Murphy, Mary Dollard, Matthew McNamara.
On Saturday (Nov. 29) Ashbury Residents Assoc.unveiled a plaque in memory of Mr Jack(John) Moyney who previously lived at No. 9 Legion Villas until his death on Remembrance Sunday 1980.

On Saturday (Nov. 29) Ashbury Residents Assoc.unveiled a plaque in memory of Mr Jack(John) Moyney who previously lived at No. 9 Legion Villas until his death on Remembrance Sunday 1980.

Ashbury’s Chairman Tommy Murphy welcomed everyone attending. Enda Ryan - great grandchild of Jack Moyney - read a short poem written by Clodagh O’Reilly while she was in primary school aged 9 entitled the ‘History of the Legion Villas’. Adrian Hewson followed with his memories of meeting Jack when he was a child and he fondly recalled seeing the VC. Betty Nolan, granddaughter of Jack, along with great grandson Enda Ryan unveiled the plaque in memory of their historic ancestor. The ceremony closed and everyone was invited back to the GAA hall for refreshments. John Moyney (Jan. 8 1895-Nov. 10 1980) was born in Rathdowney and was an Irish recipient of the VC Victoria Cross, the highest most prestigious award for gallantry and bravery in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British & Commonwealth forces. He was 22 years old, and a Lance Sgt. in the 2nd Battalion of the Irish Guards during the WWI when the following events took place. On September 13 1917 north of Broembeek, Belgium, John Moyney was in command of 15 men forming two advance posts. Surrounded by enemy fire he held his post for 96 hours, having no water and very little food. On the 5th day of the enemy advance, he attacked them with bombs, while using his Lewis gun with great effect. Finding himself and his men surrounded, he led his men in a charge through the enemy and reached a stream, where he and a private Thomas Woodcock covered their party while they crossed unscathed, before crossing themselves under a shower of bullets. He later achieved the rank of Sergeant, and died in Roscrea in 1980 and is buried in the cemetery in Roscrea. His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Guards Regimental Headquarters (Irish Guards RHQ).