DCSIMG

Online drinking game worries

A local Thurles councillor has recently spoke about the new social media craze, criticising its effects on the young generation and binge drinking in Ireland.

The online game in question originated in Australia and is called NekNominations, it consists of the individual downing a pint of alcohol in one go, the person then nominates two others to participate. More and more people have taken part in the game and as a result and have highlighted binge drinking amongst the younger generation in Ireland.

Local Cllr. Gerard Fogarty (FF) has pleaded to the younger generation who are participating in the game to consider donating a pint of blood instead of downing a pint of alcohol, he hopes for the individual to try and save a life rather then damage their own.

Cllr Fogarty stated “it has become clear that this game has spiralled out of control. More and more young people are risking their own safety to out do each other with increasingly outrageous drinking scenarios. This game only serves to normalise binge drinking and reinforce the dangerous message that young people need to get drunk to have a good time.”

Johnny Byrne (19) from Carlow and DJ Ross Cummins (22) have died as a result of playing the drinking game. The deaths of the young men have highlighted the power social media holds in influencing young adults. Fogarty believes that facebook needs to turn this problem into something more positive, it will need to outline the negatives effects of binge drinking and instil positivity into drink awareness.

His speech has encouraged us to be aware of the effects of alcohol consumption, to know your limits and to drink responsibly.

Alternatives can be taken to binge drinking, Cllr, Fogarty has asked people to consider donating blood to a save a life “We are calling on people to drink responsibly and to consider spending time to donate a pint of blood , rather then risk their own safety by downing a pint of alcohol simply to impress others.

The game is still being played and is responsible for deaths in other countries.

 
 
 

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