Bishop of Killaloe threatened to excommunicate the Archbishop of Dublin

George Cunningham recalls 800 years of Roscrea history. (see story).
It happened at Roscrea in 1213. At this time this south-west midland region of Ireland was frontier land which the Anglo-Norman were slowly fortifying and gaining the upper hand over the Gaelic lords.

It happened at Roscrea in 1213. At this time this south-west midland region of Ireland was frontier land which the Anglo-Norman were slowly fortifying and gaining the upper hand over the Gaelic lords.

But sporadic resistance of guerrilla-type warfare did occur, sometimes posing more than just a local threat. The continuing threat caused by the raids of Murchadh Ua Briain in the early 1200s to the emerging Anglo-Norman colony and the burning of five of their newly-erected castles across north Tipperary and south Offaly, forced the King’s Council and Host to gather at Roscrea. Perceiving the destruction been caused by Murchad as quite serious, they made a decision to fortify the town. The decision was a strategic one as this early monastic town was on the Slighe Dhála, one of the five great ancients roads of Ireland, and pivotally positioned in a gap between the Slieve Bloom mountains, the great Bog of Ely and Devilsbit mountain.

Full story in this week’s Tipperary Star.