Annual Liam Lynch Commemoration

By John J Hassett The Liam Lynch National Memorial Association will hold their annual Commemoration on Sunday 29th of July at 2-30pm. The Commemoration takes place at the memorial where Liam Lynch, Chief of Staff of the Irish Republican Army, was fatally wounded on the morning of April 10th 1923 on the then bleak Knockmealdown mountain side, above the village of Goatenbridge.

By John J Hassett

The Liam Lynch National Memorial Association will hold their annual Commemoration on Sunday 29th of July at 2-30pm. The Commemoration takes place at the memorial where Liam Lynch, Chief of Staff of the Irish Republican Army, was fatally wounded on the morning of April 10th 1923 on the then bleak Knockmealdown mountain side, above the village of Goatenbridge.

Knockmealdown mountain side, above the village of Goatenbridge.

Breandan Mac Cionnaith well known spokesperson of the Garvaghey Road Residents Association, during the major Drumcree Church stand off with the Orange Order, has accepted the invitation from the Association to deliver the oration at the Memorial site.

The tragic Civil War was in its final weeks; Liam Lynch had played a major part in the efforts to avoid the conflict, which resulted in the loss of great Irishmen on both sides, needed in the building of the New Ireland. The occasion is special in that annually it brings together families from both sides of the Civil War conflict to meet, pray for, and commemorate the dead who pursued Ireland’s cause for freedom and the Sovereignty of the entire country.

Liam Lynch, replying on 24 8 1922 to the dispatch that informed him of Michael Collins death at Beal na mBlath, wrote “Nothing could bring home more forcibly the awful unfortunate national situation at present than the fact that it has become necessary for Irishmen and former comrades to shoot such men as M Collins, who rendered such splendid service to the Republic in the late war against England.”

Liam Lynch was an exceptional military leader in the War of Independence as well as being an exemplary patriot of his country. Lieutenant Larry Clancy, who was in charge of the Free State soldiers who captured the fatally wounded Lynch on the mountain side, did all in his power to get medical and religious services for his prisoner and to remove him to Newcastle village. Clancy a native of Drangan had lost two brothers in the War of Independence, and was an active volunteer as well as being a prisoner of the British during the War of Independence. Larry Clancy and Liam Lynch two noble soldiers of Ireland had so much in common with each other, particularly a love of God and a love of Ireland, illustrated the tragedy of the conflict they were militarily engaged in.

Full story in this week’s Tipperary Star.