Clean Bill of Health for Sacre Coeur Nursing Home

SACRE COEUR Nursing home near Tipperary town has been given a clean bill of health by inspectors, according to a report published this week. The home has been family owned and managed as a nursing home since 1983.

SACRE COEUR Nursing home near Tipperary town has been given a clean bill of health by inspectors, according to a report published this week. The home has been family owned and managed as a nursing home since 1983.

SACRE COEUR Nursing home near Tipperary town has been given a clean bill of health by inspectors, according to a report published this week. The home has been family owned and managed as a nursing home since 1983.

On October 20th and 21st, Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) inspectors visited the home. HIQA carries out regular inspections on all care homes across the state. In an overwhelmingly positive report, inspectors noted that management at Sacre Couer have “a sound understanding of and a commitment to meeting their responsibilities as prescribed in the Health Act 2007 and the Health Act 2007.”

The home is owned and managed by Sacre Coeur Nursing Home Ltd., of which there are two directors, Selma Kelly the nominated Registered Provider and Laura Myers the Person in Charge. Ms Myers is assisted by Key Senior Manager Lelia Considine, “who has extensive clinical and managerial experience of the service”. A team of nursing staff, and other personnel “attend to the social and care needs of the residents and the operation of the service on a daily basis,” notes the HIQA report.

The centre’s first inspection was an unannounced one day visit on 26 August 2010. On that occasion the inspector was satisfied that the providers were involved in the day-to-day running of the centre and “demonstrated a clear commitment to delivering a quality service to residents.”

Sacre Coeur Nursing Home was originally built in 1911 and functioned as a convalescence facility for military personnel. The original premises is two storey with a further two-storey extension added in the early 2000s. Resident accommodation is provided on both floors in both the old and new elements of the building.

In total 26 residents can be accommodated and long-term, respite and palliative care is provided. On the day of inspection there were 25 residents living in the centre all of whom were in receipt of long-term care. Sixteen residents were greater than 80 years of age, two residents were less than 60 years of age and eight residents had a diagnosed dementia.

On this second inspection, the inspectors were satisfied that “there was supporting evidence to validate (management’s) objective of providing safe, quality, person-centred services to the residents. Where issues had arisen that had the potential to compromise the quality and safety of the services, inspectors found evidence that these issues were managed and dealt with proactively by the providers. Residents and relatives again reported a high level of satisfaction with the staff and the care and services provided. Overall the inspectors were satisfied that the residents’ safety and well being was central to the ethos of service delivery.”

“There was an awareness of and a commitment to ongoing review and continuous improvement with systems of review in place... There was evidence of improvements made since the last inspection particularly in relation to risk management, the management of complaints, restraint, fire safety, care planning, recruitment practices, and the cultivation of a person-centred approach to care and service provision.”

Some of the recommendations this time round include: more adequate and appropriate staffing at all times; staff training including mandatory training; the design and layout of the premises; receipting processes for the management of residents’ monies or other valuables.

“The numbers of staff were not at all times appropriate to the assessed needs of residents, and the size and layout of the designated centre. There was no evidence to support the verification of staff references.” This weekend staffing deficit has since been addressed by the provider.

Additionally, “elements of the design and layout presented challenges to meeting the individual and collective needs of residents.” The provider has since identified a suitable location within the home for an additional ground floor toilet. It is anticipated that these works will be completed by 31 March 2012. Full report at hiqa.ie