Landowners Urged To Cut Trees After Gales

NORTH Tipperary County Council has urged people to trim their roadside trees following the gales over the past few days.

NORTH Tipperary County Council has urged people to trim their roadside trees following the gales over the past few days.

There were concerns at this Monday’s Newport area meeting of councillors that falling trees and debris could lead to accidents or even fatalities in the coming months.

The issue was raised by Cllr Phyll Bugler, who urged that the council’s heritage officer look at trees to determine which ones might be decayed.

“It can be quite frightening driving and not knowing what tree is going to land on your car,” she said.

She was supported by the other four area councillors, with Cllr Mattie Ryan “Coole” saying trees out by Dolla were “terrible. Any tree can be knocked by wind. Heritage is not as important as people’s lives.”

Cllr Jonathan Meaney revealed that he had had a “close one” that morning when a branch fell in front of him as he wasa driving in from Portroe.

“It was ridiculous to hang on to trees for the look of the thing. Most trees are dangerous,” said Cllr John “Rocky” McGrath. “It could make good sense to trim your trees for firewood with the price of fuel.”

He suggested that clubs and organisations could cut them and sell the timber as a way to raise money.

Area engineer Michael Hayes pointed out that trees were the responsibility of landowners and the council could not cut them. He described some of the trees at Bawn as “scary”.

Senior engineer Michael F Hayes said that “every tree is potentially dangerous”. He told Cllr John Carroll that the council may have to go the legal route to have some trimming carried out because enforcement “could be tricky”. Cllr Carroll had raised the question of ensuring that overhanging branches were cut and suggested area supervisors may be able to advise on what needs to be done.