School Inspection At Killenaive NS

A WHOLE School Inspection (WSE) of Scoil Náisiúnta Cill na Naomh, Killeen, near Nenagh, has found the two-teacher, co-educational primary school offers “commendable standards” of learning and teaching in English and Maths.

A WHOLE School Inspection (WSE) of Scoil Náisiúnta Cill na Naomh, Killeen, near Nenagh, has found the two-teacher, co-educational primary school offers “commendable standards” of learning and teaching in English and Maths.

However, more work needs to be done to enhance the use of the Irish language.

School Inspectors visited Killenaive NS on September 20th 2012. The report was published recently. The report shows that school enrolment has declined and in the current school year there are 21 pupils enrolled. Attendance rates in the school are very good. There have been significant staff changes since the start of this school year. These include the appointment of the principal and one mainstream class teacher, as well as the appointment of a class teacher for the special unit for pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which was opened in September 2012.

Th WSE focuses on the quality of teaching and learning in English, Irish, Mathematics and Science, and is carried out on all national schools. The board of management of the school was given an opportunity to comment on the findings and recommendations of the report; the board chose to accept the report without response.

The following are the main strengths of the work of the school: The board of management supports the work of the school. The school staff demonstrates capacity to embrace change to further develop the school. The school building is very well maintained and very well presented. The lessons observed during the evaluation were of a good to very good quality in the majority of settings. Pupils’ behaviour is very good. Very good quality support is provided for pupils with special educational needs. Commendable standards are achieved by pupils in English reading and in Mathematics.

The following recommendations are made: The board of management and the school staff should strengthen links with parents. A range of extra-curricular activities should be provided and the full engagement of pupils in their learning should be further promoted. The school improvement plan should be reviewed and targets for whole-school review and improvement should be devised and monitored on an ongoing basis. In English, further emphasis should be placed on developing pupils’ comprehension and writing skills. Pupils’ speaking and writing skills in Irish need to be incrementally developed from class to class.

“Provision for pupils with learning difficulties and special educational needs is very good,” notes the Inspector. “Good work is being achieved by the staff in developing pupils’ social, communication and play skills. Two learning support teachers, based in schools in the local area, provide supports to pupils. The support teachers have established very good, affirming relationships with pupils. A wide variety of teaching approaches is used.”