Concern Over ‘Minority Of Council Tenants’

While tenants of North Tipperary County Council houses generally look after their property, there is a minority of repeat offenders who allow their houses to deteriorate, Cllr Michael O’Meara told the council.

While tenants of North Tipperary County Council houses generally look after their property, there is a minority of repeat offenders who allow their houses to deteriorate, Cllr Michael O’Meara told the council.

“They move in and after a short period the house has deteriorated. How can tenants move in and aafter a couple of weeks the house is in a terrile condition. It is hard for people to see the house next door to their deteriorate,” he said.

The Independent councillor called on the council to have a policy towards such tenants.

And Cllr John Kennedy wanted to know I the council could put pressure on people who allow the outside of the house to get into disrepair. He said he had come across a number of private houses that were left in bad repair on the outside.

The council’s housing officer told them that there were a small number of tenants who were either can’t or won’t look after their property and the council work with them to help maintain their houses.

The councillors were told that the council was aware of a few people causing damage to property.

Cllr O’Meara asked why the council continued to house such tenants.

Cllr Jim Ryan said that he was concerned at the length of time that elapses between council houses becoming vacant and being renovated to let.

He asked if people could he housed and that they then undertake to carry out repairs or refurbishment.

However, the housing officer replied that if the work was substantial, the council had an obligation to carry out repairs to the highest standards, but if they were only minor matters a house could be re-tenanted within two weeks.

Mayor Micheal Lowry pointed out that the housing section staff was working “above and beyond the call of duty” to accommodate people.

Fianna Fail’s Cllr Jim Casey was concerned that the banks were repossessing homes that were then be left derelict while the State was picking up the tab for rehousing the former owners.

“The houses are being left to become derelict while the State is left paying rent,” he said. “I am not criticizing the housing unit, but the bans can’t afford to see houses go into disrepair.”

But the housing official replied that the council had no say over bank repossessions.

The question of anti-social behaviour in the Respond housing in Roscrea was raised y Cllr Pauline Coonan.

“There are excellent tenants in there, but some anti-social behaviour is creeping in,” she said, “It could be nipped in the bud, urging that the council write to the housing agency about the matter.