Fundraising night for Wheelchair Basketball

Throw in at Nenagh Arena: Wheelchair Basketball is fun for both able bodied people, and those with disabilities.
Roscrea-based wheelchair user Edel Carey says getting involved in Wheelchair Basketball has given her a new sense of confidence.

Roscrea-based wheelchair user Edel Carey says getting involved in Wheelchair Basketball has given her a new sense of confidence.

Now the plan is to recruit more able-bodied people into the sport, thereby raising standards and bringing people together. While we have made great strides in integrating people with physical disabilities into mainstream society, now the aim of the IWA & other sporting ‘disability’ organisations is to turn the tables and introduce able-bodied people into disability specific sports.

Edel lives in Roscrea, and is a part-time wheelchair user for almost 20 years due to the onset of multiple sclerosis in her early 20’s. Edel says she can only walk short distance on her crutches but when she gets into a basketball wheelchair on a flat surface she is on an even keel with both able-bodied & disabled wheelchair basketball peers. “I have been playing wheelchair basketball for almost 15 years & while I have never reached league standard I have had great fun trying”.

Through the IWA Centre in Roscrea, Edel organises weekly basketball practise at the Nenagh Arena where club members from all around North Tipp and Limerick are put through their paces by Tony Hassett (Nenagh) who has been a volunteer coach with the club for the last 15 years & who received IWA’s National Volunteer Award in 2013.

There are few concessions in league standard wheelchair basketball with nets fixed at standard height. The player is allowed only two wheel pushes and then, must bounce or pass the ball. Any chair contact must be head on face to face with a sideways tackle resulting in a foul. Offence and defence structure and time regulations are in line with regular basketball.

Full story in this week’s Tipperary Star.