Tipp Nursing Home Closed - HIQA

A NURSING Home in South Tipperary which provides care for 17 elderly residents has had to close after Inspectors repeatedly found it had not implemented health and safety recommendations.

A NURSING Home in South Tipperary which provides care for 17 elderly residents has had to close after Inspectors repeatedly found it had not implemented health and safety recommendations.

Woodside House Nursing Home, in Killusty, Fethard, closed on August 19th following cancellation of the centre’s registration by the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA).

It’s understood the care provider, Irene O’Connell, had voluntarily agreed to close the home prior to the publication of a critical HIQA report published this month, while arrangements have been made to move the elderly residents out to other facilities.

HIQA cancelled the home’s registration after it found the nursing home had only implemented five of 27 actions it recommended.

The areas of concern relate to fire safety, health and safety, risk assessments, medication management practices, the quality of care plans and person-centred care.

Woodside House Nursing Home is registered to care for 20 residents and is primarily concerned with the provision of long-term care, with some respite and convalescent care also provided.

There were 17 residents living in the centre at the time of a HIQA inspection on April 18th, the results of which were published this month. Ten of the residents were more than 80 years of age and two of the residents were less than 65 years of age.

The report found that Woodside is not “purpose-built” to care for its residents. The report goes on to say that while staff were “kind and caring to residents and were well intentioned, and residents spoke well of staff”, inspectors found “marginal but unsatisfactory improvement on previous inspection findings with continuing poor practice.

“There was an absence of strong clinical leadership and there was no evident culture of ongoing review, continuous improvement and an understanding of what was a quality service. Care was kind but basic and reflected a task-orientated approach that lacked a sound contemporary evidence base and an understanding of what it was to be truly person-centred.

“There was no evidence that residents were active participants in their own care or in the organisation of the centre and services provided to them. The premises was leased by the provider who did not have complete autonomy over all aspects of environmental maintenance and inspectors found that many of the fittings, furniture and equipment were in poor condition and poorly maintained”.

The Inspector also identified that some improvements were required in medical review, policies, staff training and development, residents’ access to the grounds and “meaningful activities” for residents.

Overall, HIQA carried out four inspections of Woodside. A significant number of required improvements were identified in order to comply with the requirements of the Health Act 2007. A second inspection of the centre last year found that progress made since the first inspection was “unsatisfactory and actions required had not been satisfactorily addressed”.

These recommended improvements included; governance structures, medication management, timely medical review and follow up, nursing documentation, wound prevention and management, nutritional support, access to specialist health services, recruitment practices, along with staff education and training, elder abuse training, and maintenance of the environment.

Inspectors also had to forward a letter to the provider to elicit a satisfactory action plan in response to the inspection findings. The provider has “responded positively to the action plan and agreed acceptable timeframes with the Authority,” adds the report.