Mythic Stone Link to Queen’s Cashel Visit

AFTER all the speculation and hype, it’s finally been confirmed that the City of the Kings will play host to the Tipperary leg of the Queen of England’s state visit to the Republic of Ireland.

AFTER all the speculation and hype, it’s finally been confirmed that the City of the Kings will play host to the Tipperary leg of the Queen of England’s state visit to the Republic of Ireland.

However, when Ma’am comes to take tea in Cashel, what she might not know is that, underneath her feet, there may lie a deep and ancient link between Cashel and her royal forebears. The Tipperary Star has unearthed evidence that the Royal Coronation Stone upon which the Queen herself was crowned in 1953, may have come from Cashel.

The Coronation Stone, or the Stone of Scone, has been used to crown all English, and later, British monarchs, since it was snatched by Edward I in 1296 from the Scots, who used it to crown their Kings. Taken as a spoil of war to Westminster Abbey in London, it lies there still, underneath the chair which seats the Speaker of the House of Commons.

But the Stone’s legendary history may go back further into the mists of time. One account has it that the “Stone of Destiny” was transported to Scotland from Ireland, where it was called the “Lia Fail”, on which the Kings of Munster were crowned. At one time, the Lia Fail was “laid in the Cathedral of Cashel,” according to a 19th century history of the world called Haydn’s Dictionary of Dates.

Whatever the truth of the stone myth, it will be a huge boost to Tipperary to have thousands of curious onlookers, tourists, and media descend on Cashel for the Royal Visit. While some have objected, most see the stopover as a positive step and a potential tourist moneyspinner for the whole county.

Full story in this week’s Tipperary Star.