Minister Kelly to be asked to fix foul smelling Nenagh sewers

Cllr Hughie McGrath
Tipperary County Council has been urged to talk to local Minister for the Environment Alan Kelly about repairing the sewerage system in Nenagh’s town centre.

Tipperary County Council has been urged to talk to local Minister for the Environment Alan Kelly about repairing the sewerage system in Nenagh’s town centre.

The call came from Cllr Hughie McGrath who told Nenagh Municipal District Council that he wanted Tipperary County Council to seek funding from the Department as a “matter of urgency” to bring an end to the problem of foul smells in certain parts of the town.

“This is an ongoing issue. They are in need of repairs,” he told fellow councillors on Nenagh MDC.

His call was backed by Cllr Seamus Morris, who pointed out that when the sewers dry up in good weather they smell.

“The system is antiquated,” he said. However, he said there may not be an easy way to deal with the problem now that Irish Water had control of the system.

“Business people are lighting candles in their shops to prevent the smell from getting on their stock,” he said.

Director of Operations Marcus O’Connor, in a written reply, said that a draft preliminary report had been prepared and was being considered by Irish Water. This proposed scheme was included in Irish Water’s Proposed Capital Investment Plan (CIP) 2014-2016, which was submitted to the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) for approval. The draft preliminary report includes the upgrading of many existing sewers, including box shores on Kenyon Street.

Over the past year a range of measures had been taken to resolve the specific odour problems in the Pearse Street and Kenyon Street areas.

These included the council’s roads section providing a trapped gully at the junction of Pearse Street and Kickham Street and this proved to be very effective.

Mr O’Connor’s reply also stated that problems at a nearby building were traced to issues within the building and this had been resolved. A manhole cover in the mid-Kenyon street area was allowing gases to vent but the cover was replaced by a sealed unit some months ago and resolved the problem.

Mr O’Connor also replied that the integrity of the storm sewer on Kenyon Street had been checked with CCTV and dye testing and there was no apparent link from the foul sewer to the storm sewer which could give rise to odour issues.  However, a complaint had been made n recently and it was being monitored.

“There are old box shores acting as foul sewers in this part of town and during prolonged dry weather water is flushed through the shores to remove any deposits which might give rise to odour issues. This will continue until the upgrade works are completed,” he said.