Match Parking

Dear Editor,

Dear Editor,

I am writing to you after attending the Munster Minor Hurling Semi-Final in Thurles last night between Tipperary and Waterford. I had attended the previous game against Kerry and was not anticipating such a crowd at the Semi Final. I arrived in my car around 7.15. I was having difficulty finding parking so I said I would chance Bohernanave Church yard. I was met there by a man. I was expecting to pay €2. After all the game is an hour long, getting to and from the game and the half time break should bring it up to an hour and a half at most. I was fair annoyed when the man asked for €5. I can only assume that the man was collecting for the church.

I considered writing to the church but felt the matter would not be addressed. Someone mentioned writing to the Tipperary Star. Get your readers views. The event reminded me of the days when everyone was out to make an exorbitant buck at the expense of the ordinary punter. My question to your readers is as to whether the church has broken one of its seven deadly sins, that of GREED?

Patrick Collins.

27, Willowmere Drive,


Co. Tipperary

Seeking Info On Old Nursing Colleague

Dear Editor,

I am looking for Eileen O’Meara. Eileen went to London in 1978 to do her Nurse Training at “The Whittington Hospital”. I believe she went on to become a Midwife. She stayed in London for a few years. I believe she did return to Ireland and married. I know she has a sister called Anne and some brothers. (I cannot remember their names).

In recalling our conversations I think she may of came from the area of Clonmel.

I would be thrilled if anyone has any information or can help me find Eileen as I would love to catch up and fill in the years and chat about our nursing days.

If so please contact :-

Yours sincerely,

Gwyneth Franklin

Shock And Alarm!

Dear Editor,

It was with shock (50,000 volts) and electrifying alarm that I read your heading “Cashel Hostage Siege Ends In Tazer Shooting” which appeared in bold print on the front page of the “Tipperary Star” last week.

It goes to show that the phrase “Nobody is perfect” is still alive and well and dwelling in the offices of your paper.

The word is T A S E R.

The word most often refers to an electroshock weapon which uses electrical current to disrupt voluntary control of muscles. Tasers were introduced as non-lethal weapons to be used by police to subdue fleeing, belligerent, or potentially dangerous people, who would have otherwise been subjected to what they consider more lethal weapons (such as a firearm)

Jack Cover, a NASA researcher, began developing the Taser in 1969. By 1974, Cover had completed the device, which he named after his childhood hero Tom Swift.

Tom Swift was the author of an adventure book in the 20’s which was called “Tom Swift and his electric rifle”. Taser is an acronym. If you take the first letter of each of the words in the title, (except the word his) and rearrange the letters you will get the word “TASER”.

Tasers also provide a safety benefit to police officers as they have a greater deployment range than batons, pepper spray or empty hand techniques. This allows police to maintain a safe distance.

The use of Tasers are prohibited in Ireland, except for the Garda Emergency Response Unit and the Garda Regional Support Unit which is the special unit of the Garda Siochana use the X26 stun gun for crowd control and room clearance and the new Regional Support Units.

Yours sincerely,

Patrick Fanning.



Co. Tipperary.