Surprise, Surprise - The Toyota Avensis Doesn’t Disappoint

As someone who has a fond affinity for Japanese cars, it’s always something of a thrill to head off to a garage and take possession of one of their prized possessions to give it a run out. But, there is also a little bit of apprehension, just in case the particular vehicle awaiting a critical review, doesn’t quite live up to expectation.

As someone who has a fond affinity for Japanese cars, it’s always something of a thrill to head off to a garage and take possession of one of their prized possessions to give it a run out. But, there is also a little bit of apprehension, just in case the particular vehicle awaiting a critical review, doesn’t quite live up to expectation.

 Cutting to the chase though, it’s rather pleasing to divulge that there were no such disappointments with the Toyota Avensis which was supplied by Templemore Motors - no major surprises there, you might say.

You see, the Toyota brand is just so reliable that it is almost boring - boring in the sense that all your expectations are met and you don’t even get the pleasure of moaning about something, even just for the sake of it. Yes, I have driven Avensis’ before - have had three of them myself in fact - but, the improvements in the marque have rendered the previous models almost unrecognisable. There is much better spec now; far greater power; wonderful road holding; and class leading efficiency from the D4D engine.

I was fortunate enough to grab a 2 litre D4D Avensis Tourer - yes, I confess a real liking for the hulking great estate beasts - from the Templemore Motors yard, and setting out on the test over the last week or so, I go the feeling straight away that this would be an alliance of mutual respect. The car sat very easy with me, and I was forced to cast the mind back to the times when you could throw half the hurling teams gear into the boot, load up the bicycle, do the shopping for a fortnight, and not have to worry about what else you have in the boot. If it’s space you want, an estate is your only man.

Read Noel Dundon’s full review in the Tipperary Star