Shock as Cashel Palace Hotel shuts down

Cashel Palace Hotel
The Cashel Palace Hotel has closed its doors this week with the loss of 32 jobs delivering a crushing blow to the local economy coming up to Christmas.

The Cashel Palace Hotel has closed its doors this week with the loss of 32 jobs delivering a crushing blow to the local economy coming up to Christmas.

Stunned staff were told the devastating news on Monday morning in a meeting with owners Pat and Susan Murphy. The landmark house hotel at the foot of the Rock of Cashel has given generations of employment to local people and has a long, rich and colourful history.

It’s understood new owners could not be found for the 18th century mansion and the business has ceased trading. All bookings have been cancelled. At least one large party of 60 people who had been booked into the restaurant on Monday evening have had to be turned away. Countless actors, statesmen, sports stars, and even Heads of State have visited the Palace over the years, where according to legend, the original recipe for Guiness was first discovered. Minister of State Tom Hayes T.D. has expressed his deep disappointment at the news that the Cashel Palace Hotel is to close with the loss of all jobs. Speaking following the announcement, Minister Hayes said: “This is very sad news for the 32 people employed at the hotel, for their families and indeed for the town of Cashel. I am confident though that the hotel still has a future, given its location in the centre of Cashel.There is no doubt that it is a difficult industry and although signs are showing a continued improvement in the economy, many businesses continue to struggle. We are doing all we can to aid these businesses that find themselves in trouble and we will offer former staff at the Cashel Palace all the resources possible to help them in looking for employment or entering education.” The Cashel Palace Hotel was built in 1730 by Archbishop Theophilus Bolton. It was designed by Sir Edward Lovett Pearce who was also the Architect of the Old Parliament House in Dublin, which is now the Bank of Ireland, College Green.

Management told local media they did not want to comment on the closure.