Open night draws dignitaries from across Ireland to St Patrick’s Rock

St. Patrick would have loved it - after all what a great toastmaster he would have been using just a three-leafed shamrock as a prop! The Cashel Toastmasters open night proved a great success with a full house attendance, including dignitaries from Roscrea down to Mitchelstown, also Dublin, Kildare and Shannon.

St. Patrick would have loved it - after all what a great toastmaster he would have been using just a three-leafed shamrock as a prop!

The Cashel Toastmasters open night proved a great success with a full house attendance, including dignitaries from Roscrea down to Mitchelstown, also Dublin, Kildare and Shannon.

The event brought members and non members alike. St Patrick’s Rock was the perfect venue and set off the weekend celebrations beautifully shrouded in its green light. Upon arrival guests were greeted by the musical sounds of a harpist and guitarist, then shown to the audio visual room of the Vicars Choral. Five young dancers trained locally and whose ages ranged from 10 to five gave a beautiful display of Irish dancing. The very youngest is a granddaughter of one of our members. Our Master of Ceremonies a North Tipperary man did a wonderful job running the show and was delighted to extol the virtues of our Rock. There were three speeches with subjects as varied as the story of the history of St. Patrick’s Rock, to an inspiring Italian community living in America who hold the ingredient to a long life. We had our very own ‘is feidir linn’ moment in an uplifting speech telling us anything is possible. In typical Toastmaster fashion the speeches were evaluated and the conclusion more speeches, please.

In Toastmasters we are lucky to have many Irish speakers and on Friday night one of our members a native of An Rinn recited a beautiful piece of poetry ‘Mo dTugadh Fein’. The ghost of Archbishop Theophilus Bolton who founded the Bolton Library in Cashel would have given an approving nod as a passage from an article written by a retired doctor in 1876 in the ‘Cashel Gazette’ called ‘Our Sorrows’ was read faultlessly to a hushed crowd. We were very fortunate to get permission from the Gluckmann Library and the University of Limerick to ‘borrow’ this publication.

Keeping the Irish flavour of the night the musical interlude featured the wonderful concertina playing of ‘Casadh an tSugan’.