Dick Hogan launches Irish
traditional music collection

Renowned Tipperary traditional singer Dick Hogan has published a stand-alone collection and reference book of songs and spoken pieces almost entirely from the Irish tradition.

Renowned Tipperary traditional singer Dick Hogan has published a stand-alone collection and reference book of songs and spoken pieces almost entirely from the Irish tradition.

The Hogan Collection is published in a 300-page song book and a box set of 20 cds of the entire collection and in addition this extensive collection is available as twenty-five individual cds in 12 themes including; rare songs (five volumes), humourous, suggestive and fantastical (three volumes), songs our parents loved (three volumes), nationalistic songs and ballads (two volumes), Amhráin as Gaeilge (two volumes), songs of Clare (two volumes), songs of Love and sentiment (two volumes), the big songs (two volumes), songs of Tipperary, songs of Percy French, songs of Nioclás Tóibín and a children’s album.

Dick undertook the project at the Fleadh Nua in Ennis with the first recording session taking place in Cruise’s snug in the Queens Hotel on May 27th 2007 following encouragement from many people who share an interest in ensuring that his songs would not be lost and be recorded for future generations. Dick continued the work on this considerable production at various studios and at his home over the next six years. The collection will be launched at the Willie Clancy Summer School Miltown Malbay on July 7th.

The reasons for this project were threefold. Firstly, Dick wanted to record a representation of all the songs he has sung since his childhood days. The second reason is that the project would be an educational tool for children to find out what life was like at the time, which isn’t all that long ago. There is a huge amount of social history in the project including a special children’s album with thirty-two tracks in all, with simple songs in Irish and spoken comical riddles and ditties. The third reason is the hope that at least some of the songs might gain currency again. In the more recent years more and more people have been asking Dick where he got the songs and finally he came to the realisation that there is at least two generations that have simply never heard this material.

Dick’s ambition is to make the recordings and the book available to schools, libraries and the wider Irish community at home and abroad in the hope that it will encourage an uptake in interest in the singing of these traditional songs.

The collection is available from all good record and bookshops and online at www.tradirishsongs.com.